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Draff

Aymeric Renoud

Profession: Designer and Fabricator

Project: Draff Studio

Based in: Dundee

Platform Member: Make Works Scotland / Paved With Gold

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Draff Studio

Unique and sustainable sheet material, created reusing grain left over after brewing beer and gin; now being used to create bespoke furniture.

Originally from Marboz in France, Aymeric Renoud is a Dundee based designer and fabricator who, since moving to Scotland, has combined his interest in sustainable design with his passion and curiosity for the distilling and brewing world. After many years of research and experimentation into the properties and possibilities of reusing the wastage from alcohol production as a material, he has created Draff, a sheet material created from the reused remains of malt after brewing.

Feuilleté Chair

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Made with barley draff from Dundee-based 71 Brewing Beer and ash plywood

Photographer: Gavin Craigie

With an estimated 48,700 tonnes of waste grain produced in Scotland a year, for beer only, Draff is sustainable, reusing material that could otherwise end up in a landfill.

The process to create the Draff Material begins straight after the mashing or distilling process. The grain and botanicals are collected and dried out as quickly as possible in the workshop. Heat and high pressure are then applied to the raw ingredients, which is key to creating a dense and reliable material. The result is a material that is durable, sustainable, and unique.

Peg Stool

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Made with junpier draff from a local gin distillery and ash wood, with brass finishes

Photographer: Gavin Craigie

Each sheet of Draff is unique and can be tailored to an individual’s requirements, using different grains or botanicals and the heating process, which influences the colouring of the material. Draff can be used in a variety of design projects, from decorative cladding to the pieces of bespoke furniture that Aymeric designs and creates in his workshop.

Draff tables and chairs in the 'Culture Lab' at Dundee Science Centre

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Photographer: Grant Anderson